Free crochet dragon egg pattern

Here it is, the moment I know that most of you, my lovely lovely followers, have been waiting for. I apologize for making you wait for over a year, but I so appreciate your patience. And the fact that you did not form a mob and come after me with torches and pitchforks!

Before I add the pattern, I just wanted you to know that my promised tutorial can be found after it. I’ve never written a pattern before, so I thought that some visual aide could compensate for any incorrect notations.

Now, without further ado…


 

Crochet Dragon Egg

  • Skill Level: Intermediate
  • Size: 5″ x 4″
  • Materials: approx 185 yrds of size 10 crochet thread, size 3 crochet hook, cotton batting
  • Work Time: approx 8 hours per egg

Stitch Explanations

SCALE FOUNDATION (foundation)
2sc b/w scale center, ch2, 2dc b/w mid scales, ch2

SCALE FOUNDATION DECREASE 1 (foundation-ch1)
2sc b/w scale center, ch1, 2dc b/w mid scales, ch1

SCALE FOUNDATION DECREASE 2 (foundation-no ch)
2sc b/w scale center, 2tr b/w mid scales

FOUNDATION INCREASE (INC)
2sc b/w scale center, ch1, 2dc b/w scale center and mid scales, ch1, 2sc b/w mid scales, ch1, 2dc b/w mid scales and scale center, ch1

FOUNDATION DECREASE (DEC)
hdc b/w scale center, hdc b/w mid scales, hdc b/w scale center, ch2, 2dc b/w mid scales, ch2

MODIFIED CROCODILE STITCH (scale)
(hdc, 6dc) around right dc post, ch1, sc b/w last 2 dc, turn, 6dc around left dc post, sl st b/w next post

LARGER SCALE (scale-XL)
(hdc, 7dc) around right tr post, ch1, sc b/w last dc, turn, 7dc around left tr post, sl st b/w next post

Pattern

Base
ch2
RND 1: 6sc into first st (6)
RND 2: 2hdc into each st (12)
RND 3: [2hdc into first st, hdc into next st] 6 times (18)
RND 4: [2hdc into first st, hdc into next 2 sts] 6 times (24)
RND 5: [2hdc into first st, hdc into next 3 sts] 6 times (30)
RND 6: hdc into each st (30)
RND 7: [2hdc into first st, hdc into next 4 sts] 6 times (36)
RND 8: [2hdc into first st, hdc into next 5 sts] 6 times (42)
RND 9: [2hdc into first st, hdc into next 6 sts] 6 times (48)
RND 10: hdc into each st (48)

Scales
RND 1: ch2, dc into first st, ch2, sk 2 st, [2sc into next st, ch2, sk 2 st, 2dc into next st, ch2, sk 2 st] 7 times, 2sc into next st (16 posts)
RND 2: [scale] 8 times, sl st b/w last post (8 scales)

Increase
RND 3: ch2, dc into first post, ch2, INC, [foundation] 3 times, INC, [foundation] 2 times, 2sc b/w scale center (20 posts)
RND 4: [scale] 10 times, sl st b/w last post (10 scales)
RND 5: ch2, dc into first post, ch2, [foundation] 9 times, 2sc b/w scale center
RND 6: repeat RND 4 (2 rounds of 10 scales)
RND 7: ch2, dc into first post, ch2, INC, [foundation] 3 times, INC, [foundation] 4 times, 2sc b/w scale center (24 posts)
RND 8: [scale] 12 times, sl st b/w last post (12 scales)
RND 9: ch2, dc into first post, ch2, [foundation] 11 times, 2sc b/w scale center
RND 10: [scale] 12 times, sl st b/w last post
RND 11: repeat RND 9
RND 12: repeat RND 10
ROW 13: repeat RND 9
RND 14: repeat RND 10 (4 rounds of 12 scales)

Decrease
RND 15: ch2, dc into first post, ch2, DEC, [foundation] 4 times, DEC, [foundation] 3 times, 2sc b/w scale center (20 posts)
RND 16: scale, sk DEC post, [scale] 5 times, sk DEC post, [scale] 4 times, sl st b/w last post (10 scales)
RND 17: ch2, dc into first post, ch2, 2sc b/w scale center, ch2, [dc b/w 2hdc] 2 times, ch2, [foundation] 4 times, 2sc b/w scale center, ch2, [dc b/w 2hdc] 2 times, ch2, [foundation] 3 times, 2sc b/w scale center
RND 18: [scale] 10 times, sl st b/w last post
RND 19: ch2, dc into first post, ch2, [foundation] 9 times, 2sc b/w scale center
RND 20: repeat RND 18
RND 21: repeat RND 19
RND 22: repeat RND 18
RND 23: ch2, dc into first post, ch2, [foundation] 9 times, 2sc b/w scale center
RND 24: repeat RND 18 (5 rounds of 10 scales)
RND 25: ch2, dc into first post, ch2, DEC, [foundation] 3 times, DEC, [foundation] 2 times, 2sc b/w scale center (16 posts)
RND 26: scale, sk DEC post, [scale] 4 times, sk DEC post, [scale] 3 times, sl st b/w last post (8 scales)
RND 27: ch2, dc into first post, ch1, 2sc b/w scale center, ch1, [dc b/w 2hdc] 2 times, ch1, [foundation-ch1] 3 times, 2sc b/w scale center, ch1, [dc b/w 2hdc] 2 times, ch1, [foundation-ch1] 2 times, 2sc b/w scale center
RND 28: [scale] 8 times, sl st b/w last post (2 rounds of 8 scales)
RND 29: ch2, dc into first post, ch1, DEC, [foundation-ch1] 2 times, DEC, foundation-ch1, 2sc b/w scale center (12 posts)
RND 30: scale, sk DEC post, [scale] 3 times, sk DEC post, [scale] 2 times, sl st b/w last post (6 scales)
RND 31: ch2, dc into first post, 2sc b/w scale center, [tr b/w 2hdc] 2 times, [foundation-no ch] 2 times, 2sc b/w scale center, [tr b/w 2hdc] 2 times, foundation-no ch, 2sc b/w scale center
RND 32: [scale] 6 times, sl st b/w last post (2 rounds of 6 scales)
*STUFF
RND 33: ch3, tr into first post, DEC, foundation-no ch, DEC, 2sc b/w scale center (8 posts)
RND 34: scale-XL, sk DEC post, [scale-XL] 2 times, sk DEC post, scale-XL, sl st b/w last post (1 round of 4 scales)
RND 35: ch3, tr into first post, 2sc b/w scale center, [tr b/w 2hdc] 2 times, hdc b/w scale center, hdc b/w mid scales, hdc b/w scale center, [tr b/w 2hdc] 2 times, 2sc b/w scale center (6 posts)
RND 36: [scale-XL] 2 times, sk DEC post, scale-XL, sl st b/w last post (1 round of 3 scales)
RND 37: ch1, [sc into first post, sc b/w mid scale and scale center, sc into scale center, sc b/w scale center and mid scale] 3 times

Close
(Option 1)
RND 38: [sc dec] 6 times
Bind off. Sew ends in.

1 More Scale (Option 2)
RND 38: [sc dec] 4 times, [dc into next stitch] 2 times, sc dec
RND 39: sc dec, sk 2 st, scale, sl st
Bind off. Sew ends in.


For a guide to re-sizing the eggs, go here.


 

This pattern might look complicated, but it’s essentially made up of 6 basic stitches: chain (ch), single (sc), double (dc), treble (tr) and slip (sl st) stitches. If you know how to do these, I’m confident that you can finish this project!

And even though there are 7 items in the stitch explanation, there are essentially only 4 sequences you need to have down. The rest are variations of those for when you increase and decrease. If you can work these 4 out, this pattern won’t be hard. I believe in you!

So don’t be afraid! I’ll walk you through it. Let’s start with my made up terminology.

bad-mushroom_terminology

Throughout the pattern you’ll see the terms “scale center” and “mid scales”. “Scale center” is pretty self explanatory, as it refers to the center of the scale. “Mid scales” is a little less apparent. It refers to the 2sc between the individual scales. It’s at the mid(dle of the) scales.

Now that we have that cleared up, we can move on to the foundation.

bad-mushroom_foundation

This is the base you’ll be building the scales on. It’s formed with alternating 2sc and 2dc’s, which I refer to as “posts”. It’ll look like little waves when you’re done, but don’t worry, after a couple rounds they even out.

Since a lot of people have asked about this, each foundation row starts with a ch2, which counts as a post. After the ch2, you dc into the first post, which is technically the last post of your previous row. Or, you can think of it this way. Ch2 and dc into the post directly beneath it. This will form the 2 posts to form your first scale of the next row on.

With the exception of increase and decrease rounds, to build a foundation you just 2sc into each scale center and 2dc into each mid scales, with ch 2 in between them. Basically, you’re doing the opposite of the round beneath it, since the scales are formed on the dc posts and the sc’s form the space between scales.

You’ll only encounter the two variations of the foundation (foundation-ch1 and foundation-no ch) after round 27 of the scales.

The only difference between foundation-ch 1 and the basic foundation is that it calls for ch1 between the sc and dc posts instead of ch2.

Foundation-no ch differs in two ways. It uses 2tr instead of 2dc, and it requires no stitches between posts. The reason it changes is because I noticed that the dc posts get a little smaller towards the top of the egg, therefore it gets harder to work scales. Using tr’s gives more room to make scales on.

Both variations of the foundation help to shape the egg.

Next up: foundation increases.

bad-mushroom_increase

On an increase stitch, you have to add 2 additional posts in the spaces between where normal stitches are placed. So you would start a foundation like normal, working 2sc into the scale center. But instead of chaining two and moving directly to the mid scales, you would ch 1 and 2dc around the ch 2 between the scale center (on the right) and the mid scale (on the left). The ch 2 strand is hidden behind the scale. You can also 2dc around the top dc of the scale too, if you prefer.

After that, you’d ch 1 again, and instead of 2dc’s into the mid scales, you’d work 2sc into it, since the foundation calls for alternating dc’s and sc’s. You’d repeat the above process and ch 1, followed by 2dc around the ch 2 between the mid scales (now on the right) and the next scale center (on the left).

Finish off with another ch 1. Now we’re back to normal and you’d continue making your basic foundation.

For the sake of visual demonstration, I used all dc’s in the image above so that you can clearly see where the stitches belong.

bad-mushroom_increase2

This is what your increase stitches will actually look like.

Now to cover foundation decreases.

bad-mushroom_decrease

Decreases are much easier to explain than increases. You simply make one hdc into the scale center, mid scales, and next scale center. No chains are needed between them. Voila! You have a decrease post.

Now, what might need a little more explanation is the sk DEC post and[dc b/w 2hdc] 2 times instructions you’ll encounter in the decrease section of the pattern.

bad-mushroom_decrease2

Typically on scale rounds, you sl st into the 2sc posts between scales, but considering DEC posts have 2 spaces instead of 1, which post do you sl st into? Neither! Just skip it. We’ll deal with the pesky DEC post in the next round.

bad-mushroom_decrease3

So now you’re on your next foundation round and you’ve reached the DEC post. Since the preceding stitch was a 2sc and the DEC post counts as mid scales, you need to make a 2dc post. Since the DEC has 2 spaces, not one, make one dc into each space.

That takes care of the simple foundation stitches. Now for the fun part: the scales! If you’ve used crocodiles stitches already, this will be a breeze. It’s the same method, with only 2 additional stitches to give it a less rounded shape. If you haven’t encountered that stitch before, I’ll try my best to explain.

bad-mushroom_posts

So after you’ve made an entire round of foundation posts, it’s time to make a round of scales. Scales are built on the dc posts of the foundation round. The stitches are worked in the direction of the arrows, from the top to bottom of the right post, then from the bottom to top of the left post.

Now let’s look at the stitches needed to form it.

bad-mushroom_croc-stitch

(hdc, 6dc) around right dc post, ch1, sc b/w last dc, turn, 6dc around left dc post, sl st b/w next post

Let’s break it down.

(hdc, 6dc) around right dc post. You start with an hdc at the top of the right post, then make 6dcs, working your way down the post. As shown in the picture, all stitches are worked from the back of the post to the front. So insert your hook behind the right post, then up through the middle of the two posts.

It can be a little awkward crocheting in this direction, so I find it helps if I fold the work in half and work sideways, like so:

bad-mushroom_croc-stitch2

ch1, sc b/w last dc This is where my scales deviate from the standard crocodile stitch. I’ve added these 2 stitches to give the scale its point. After the 6dc’s, chain 1 and sc between the last 2 dc’s of the previous bit.

Here’s an image with crochet notations for a little clarification.

bad-mushroom_croc-stitch3

turn, 6dc around left dc post, sl st b/w next post If you are working sideways, you turn your work so that the top of your foundation goes from being on the right, to being on the left. Work the last 6dc from the bottom to the top of the left post. Lastly, slip stitch into the 2sc post.

TADA! Your scale is done!

Wait, your scale is misshapen? How did this happen?!

bad-mushroom_scale-distort

Don’t fret, friend! It happens sometimes. Just tug on your scale and it should straighten out.

bad-mushroom_scale-distort2

So that’s how I make my scales. I apologize if any of this has confused you more. If it has, here’s a useful video from The Crochet Crowd on how to do the crocodile stitch. He starts the scales around 6 minutes. I understand that watching someone do it can sometimes be more helpful than pictures and written instructions. I hope it helps!

Now that you’re acclimated to my terminology and we’ve covered the stitch explanations, you’re fully equipped to tackle the pattern!

bad-mushroom_base

If you’ve made amigurumi before, the base needs no explanation. It’s your basic ball.

The scales section needs no further explanation since we covered all the stitches you need in the stitch explanations.

bad-mushroom_egg-tops

Lastly, there are 2 ways to close the egg. The first is the simple way, and the second is slightly more complicated. Both start by making a series of 12 sc’s. They are placed similarly to the increase stitches, with stitches made between the scale centers and mid scales. But instead of 2dc’s, you make 1 sc into each spot.

If you choose the easy route, you just sc dec around, then bind off.

The second option starts similarly to the first, but instead of sc dec’s all the way around, you make 4 sc dec’s, then one dc into each of the next two stitches, then one more sc dec to finish the round. For the final round, you make one last sc dec, then skip the next 2 stitches and make one last scale using the 2 dc posts you created in the previous step. Bind off and you’re done!

When you cut your thread, make sure to leave a 3 to 4 inch tail. It needs to be long enough to sew your gap and sew through the egg.

I know this way to finish is not as elegant as some options. I opted to use this method because, stickler that I am for accuracy, I wanted to get as close to the eggs on the show as I could, and it seems that there’s a single, small scale that sits at the top.

Just a suggestion if you plan to make the full set: Start with the white egg. It’s easier to see the stitches in this color. It’s hard to see the stitches in black, so once you’re comfortable with the pattern you can tackle that one.

I hope all this makes sense. If anything needs further clarification, don’t hesitate to shoot me an ask or a message. I’ll try my best to answer any questions and guide you through it. And as always, I’d love to see any creations or variations you make with this pattern!

Lastly and once again, I apologize for taking so long to post this. I cannot state how much I appreciate your patience, and that you stuck around. But I think that in the end, it was for the best. This pattern is much better than the first one, if I do say so myself.

bad-mushroom_egg-comparison

And as my faithful followers, you deserve no less than the best! <3

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